West Backs Away from Georgia in Hope of Gaining Russian Support on Larger Objectives Elsewhere

The United States and the European Union have both changed their positions on the conflict in Georgia, informing Kiev the West needs to seek greater cooperation with Russia, according to a usually well-informed online intelligence service, Stratfor.

Its sources report that Georgia was given this message on the sidelines of a ministerial meeting of NATO in Brussels on March 5. The report says that Georgian Prime Minister Nikoloz Gilauri was told that NATO cannot protect his country militarily from Russia, even though Georgia is still promised eventual membership in the alliance. The warning reportedly came from both Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and EU External Relations Commissioner Benita Ferrero-Waldner.

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“Dirty” Secret About Clean Wind Energy: It Doesn’t Reduce CO2 Emissions in EU, Yet

The booming business in wind and new “renewables” has got Europe all fired up, especially Germany, a world leader in wind-energy production. Its promise is regularly touted in a blaze of publicity.

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Tymoshenko Victorious in Gas Wars

The only winner in the recent energy standoff between Russia and the Ukraine was Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, who is now viewed as having wrested the least-bad deal for Ukraine in her bargaining with Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin.

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Economic Crisis Triggers Police Backlash Against Illegal Immigrants in Spain

Police in Madrid have been assigned secret quotas of the number of illegal immigrants to arrest – apparently aimed at responding to Spain’s rising unemployment, according to the Financial Times. The country’s main industry, construction, has been hard hit by a real-estate collapse and its ranks reportedly contain many “undocumented” workers from North Africa, eastern Europe and Latin America.
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Global Economic Meltdown Fells Latvia's Government - Will Other EU Leaders Also Fall Victim to Violent Social Uprisings

The Latvian Prime Minister, Ivars Godmanis, has resigned under popular pressure and violent protests against his center-right coalition government. The collapse of his government fits a pattern that started in Iceland, where the government fell last month as a result of social unrest due to the impact of the economic recession.

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America’s Structural Resilience Offers a Basis for Hope in Obama Presidency

As Obama takes his first steps as President, some voices are predicting that the financial crisis foreshadows the demise of U.S. leadership in the world.

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Europe Gasping in Russian Gas Dispute

The geopolitical significance continues emerging more and more strongly in the imbroglio about getting Russian gas to Europe – via the pipelines that cross Ukraine.

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Washington Sees Russian Gas Shut Off as Intended Wedge Between Europeans and Ukraine about its Bid to Join NATO

The Russian shut-off of natural gas supplies to Ukraine (and now to Western Europe) is described by Moscow as a commercial dispute with Kiev about the pricing and debts of Russian energy exports to Ukraine.

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Prominent German Industrialist, Jurgen Thumann, Strongly Supports Continuity of the Transatlantic Economic Council

Opening the meeting, Joelle Attinger, President of the European Institute, stressed the need to strengthen the economic partnership between the U.S. and Europe.

Even amid the acute current economic slump, the U.S. global trade deficit with grew by 1.1 percent in October – a reminder of the need for maintaining strong transatlantic cooperation.

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Obama Plans to Rebalance Military Power With Stronger Civilian Role In Conflicts

Clear indications are emerging about a radical shift in the Obama administration that intends to make a change in U.S. strategy dealing with global stability.

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Drug Companies Overcharge in Europe by Billions by Blocking Generics Says EU

European consumers and state-run health-care programs are being charged an extra €3 billion ($3.87 billion) annually because major pharmaceutical companies are creating barriers for the production and use of cheaper generic drugs, the European Commission says.

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Troubles of the U.S. "Big 3" in Detroit: What About their European Rivals?

In the months-long run-up to the bailout in Detroit, little was said about foreign competition. But the concern was always there. In announcing the 17.4 billion dollar loan, a White House official stipulated to the Washington Post that, “The companies will have to restructure their wage and benefit agreements so that by the end of 2009 they are competitive with foreign automakers that have plants in the U.S.”

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US Intelligence is Pessimistic about Long-Term Outlook for Europe as a Power

Europe risks losing political, military, and economic importance in a multi-polar world that will emerge over the next two decades. That view emerges in “Global Trends 2025: A Transformed World” a report issued by the National Intelligence Council.

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Russia’s Claim of Comparison Between Georgia and Serbia is “Red Herring”

Russia is stepping up its campaign to impose a moral equivalence between its military action against Georgia over South Ossetia last summer and NATO’s intervention against Serbia over Kosovo in 1998-1999.

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British Doubts on Afghan War Show Big Transatlantic Splits on NATO Strategy

Amid the daily reports of deepening military problems in Afghanistan, NATO operations there are at risk not just because of the mounting tempo of the Taliban but also because allied capitals are papering over deep disagreements about the strategy and the conduct of the campaign. The command structure is afflicted by the simultaneous presence in the field of many three and four-star generals from different countries and their divergences have damaged morale among troops and officials on the ground and spread pessimism in the Western media, especially in Europe. The U.S. feeling of political concern has become acute now that Britain is showing signs of becoming lukewarm about its Afghan commitment. If Britain, the key U.S. ally in the campaign, were to pull its forces out of Afghanistan, it would be easy to see other European governments following the British lead to the exit.

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IMF Relief for Hungary Only First Possible Rescue for European Victims of Crisis

Hungary has received a 20 billion Euro ($25.5 billion) rescue package by the International Monetary Fund, the EU, and the World Bank to help restructure their economy and fight off the possible collapse of the forint.

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Will Crisis Boost the Euro and Eurozone as Rival to Dollar and US Financial System?

Will the global financial crisis function as a turning point in the currency rivalry between the U.S. dollar and the euro? Could it result in the “eurozone” rivaling or even replacing the U.S. financial system as the mainstay of global capitalist markets?

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Will Europe Lose Access to International Space Station Due to Unilateral U.S. Decision?

ESA (European Space Agency) faces the threat of having no way to get its cargo and astronauts to the international space station (ISS) because NASA has decided to cut off the U.S. space shuttle early - in 2010 - five years before a new generation of space craft take over the transport duties.

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Russian Cyber-War Attack on Georgia Spurs Defense Ideas for U.S and Allies

In Georgia, reports indicate that organized cyber-warfare attacks continue against key government websites - attacks that appear to be coming from organized groups in Russia.

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The Dark Side of Globalization: Transnational Crime in Europe

In textbooks, globalization may have its good sides and less-good sides, but there are no redeeming features to the dark side of globalization - organized crime with global reach.

 

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