On December 17, 2012, The European Institute held its Annual Ambassadors' Dinner honoring The Honorable Robert Hormats, U.S. Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy and the Environment. Under Secretary Hormats highlighted key opportunities for greater U.S.-EU economic cooperation in the coming year, including the prospects and challenges of reaching a comprehensive trade agreement. The event was co-hosted by the 36 European Ambassadors of the Ambassadorial Host Committee.

Click here to read Secretary Hormats's remarks.

On November 30, 2012, The European Institute held a special discussion with The Honorable Danuta Hübner, Member of the EPP Group in the European Parliament, Chair of the Parliament’s Committee on Regional Development and former European Commissioner for Regional Policy. Mrs. Hübner discussed the myths of the European economic crisis and detailed what government institutions, particularly the European Parliament, are doing to resolve the crisis.

On November 8, 2012 The European Institute hosted a discussion with His Excellency Peter Ammon, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to the United States, on what kind of Europe Germany wants and what the attendant implications could be for European-American relations.

Click here to read Ambassador Ammon's remarks.

On June 6, The European Institute, in partnership with the Embassy of Portugal, welcomed The Honorable Paulo Portas, Portuguese Minister of Foreign Affairs, to a breakfast discussion on Portugal’s perspective of the political and economic climate in Europe.  Speaking just days after the receiving the fourth positive evaluation of Portugal’s economic recovery program from the EU, the ECB and the IMF joint mission, Minister Portas detailed strategies for further improving his nation’s economic health and strengthening the European Union.

JPaulHorne3nov11bxEurope must be grateful to Greece for dramatizing: how the Euro is fundamentally flawed; how the Euro’s failure could cause a financial-economic disaster; and how European Union (EU) leaders must, despite all their differences and electoral setbacks, cooperate to avoid a Greek tragedy.

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